Author Archive

Stop the morning and grab the toast!

Great Taste great jam !

Blackcurrant Extra Jam a winner , so is the Strawberry. So in 2013 I entered the great taste I won 2 * for my Lemon curd, 1* for my raspberry and in 2016 I entered again with strawberry syrup and yep it is a winner with 2 * so just when I thought I missed the enter deadline. I managed to squeeze in with 2 of my best selling products strawberry Jam and of course Blackcurrant, into 2017 awards. and……..this is what the judges said….

Strawberry jam achieved a star  the judges comments on this 
 
“Wonderful fresh summer strawberries on the nose, the set is perfect. The judges really liked the whole strawberries that still had a delightful texture and a lasting, fragrant strawberry flavour. Skillfully made”
 
and my Blackcurrant extra jam achieving 3 stars. I am feeling very proud of this achievement and I would like to thank you for the support, judges comments. 

“Beautiful deep blackcurrant flavours on the nose, a thick set, giving a deep, lasting flavour, not overly sweet, allowing the true fruit flavour to shine through. The judges loved the sheer intensity of fresh blackcurrant flavours, the quality of the fruit and gentle preservation.”

So if you fancy learning my secrets of great jam making come along to my cooking lessons at :

http://www.chewtonglen.com/the-kitchen/courses-pricing/exploring/spotted-potted-pickled/

Stop the morning and grab the toast!

Great Taste great jam !

Blackcurrant Extra Jam a winner , so so is the Strawberry. So in 2013 I entered the great taste I won 2 * for my Lemon curd, 1* for my raspberry and in 2016 I entered again with strawberry syrup and yep it is a winner with 2 * so just when I thought I missed the enter deadline. I managed to squeeze in with 2 of my best selling products strawberry Jam and of course Blackcurrant, into 2017 awards. and……..this is what the judges said….

Strawberry jam achieved a star  the judges comments on this 
 
“Wonderful fresh summer strawberries on the nose, the set is perfect. The judges really liked the whole strawberries that still had a delightful texture and a lasting, fragrant strawberry flavour. Skillfully made”
 
and my Blackcurrant extra jam achieving 3 stars. I am feeling very proud of this achievement and I would like to thank you for the support, judges comments. 

“Beautiful deep blackcurrant flavours on the nose, a thick set, giving a deep, lasting flavour, not overly sweet, allowing the true fruit flavour to shine through. The judges loved the sheer intensity of fresh blackcurrant flavours, the quality of the fruit and gentle preservation.”

So if you fancy learning my secrets of great jam making come along to my cooking lessons at :

http://www.chewtonglen.com/the-kitchen/courses-pricing/exploring/spotted-potted-pickled/

Chestnuts

 

Chestnuts

chestnuts nuts2 chestnuts

I’ve always had an instinct and natural urge for foraging, that has continued to push me outside.

As no matter where you are, no matter the time of year there always something to find to eat!. Foraging has always played a big part in my life but now it’s also instrumental to my work. Apart from the free food  there are other benefits too. Exercise and this time of year leaf kicking is a great way to feel young! I am sure that I did once hear on radio 4 that there is something fundamental and beneficial about the bacteria on the leafs. That it is good for us to breathe in when kicking up the leaves during autumn, unfortunately I can’t remember all the details!

So on a bright  afternoon, after the fog had cleared, I was off to forage for jam in the ground of the Chewton Glen, I take my usual route through the cut, across the road and then into the small woodland. I just can’t help but kick up the leaves, it’s then I notice them, little furry green husks, spiky balls and they are holding their very own crown jewels beautiful little brown chestnuts!

I’ve found treasure! wow o wow,  I had almost forgotten about these little beauties I’ve been so busy with hedgerow fruits recently, just how could I forget about the season’s best tasting nut! So without a thought for rose hips I was down on damp ground picking through the leaves and gathering chestnuts.

walkthe nuts

So while my jeans were gathering mud as I rustled in the leaves,  the moment begins to rekindles memories, and as always my memories always seem to start in the our family kitchen with my mum.  I would watch her put together some wonderful recipes and I wish now I take a pen to paper and written them all down. But the smell of these chestnuts takes me to her kitchen, while after foraging for  those angry spiky furry balls, we would pick out the nuts, and that distinct aromas of burnt ambers, almost earthy yes the chestnuts were roasting. Or we store the beauties for use later in the Christmas stuffing.

But what else did she do apart from the stuffing ? I hold still, kneeing on the wet ground trying hard to bring back “Christmas past”,  I laugh! All I think of is the exploding chestnuts in the rayburn ( I haven’t forgotten to pierce the chestnuts since!)

 I giggle and while I’m thinking, I get a message from Darren Venables, the wonderful head gardener from the Chewton Glen, he suggests a roast chestnut party just,  what I was thinking! but hey what about a Jam? There is plenty here. 

It’s not that we won’t have a party, however being a little obsessed  with jam, I just can’t help but think about making a jam,  it’s in my bones.

I dig deep and finally remember this recipe something that I made some many moons ago. So without rambling on! here’s the recipe:

 

Chestnut (Jam)

 

– 1 kg of chestnuts

– 650g of vanilla sugar (can use granulated sugar if you wish)

– one vanilla pod (optional depends how much your sugar tastes of vanilla )

– Juice of a lemon

(check last blogs for sterilising jars etc)

 

  • Chestnuts have two skins so first your need to peel the outer skin it’s a little difficult and your need a sharp knife and insert it at the top of the nut and carefully peel away the first layer.
  • Then pop them into a large pan of boiled water and simmer for about 10-15 minutes, then remove the chestnuts a little at a time and peel the second layer of skin.
  • Once you have skinned all the nuts it can take some time. (I promise if I find a faster way or a tool to do this with I’ll let you know)
  • Now the messy bit press the chestnuts though a sieve to remove the husky bits. (this is the non technical bit and other jam makers hate this bit. if you add equal amounts of sugar to the nuts as you would in jam then your get a rather sweet jam nothing wrong with it).
  • However I like more of a chestnut taste so asto be more versatile so like to use less sugar.
  • Add the rest of the ingredients and cook for about 20-30mins and bring to a rolling boil check for the set (softer than fruit jams) and pot in sterilised jars.

 

This is great in a chestnut bellini and of course on pancakes it’s heaven

Its pairs very well with whiskey so great for a cake! (or even in a whiskey)

 

Some day my Quince will ripen!

quince01

 

Quince’s  have been grown for centuries, a fruit that is a quiet king of the orchard, a truly magnificent fruit. Here in England they are misunderstood, overlooked and underused, so get out and find your quince he may look like a frog but once you cook it it turns into a prince.  Something as simple as adding quince to an apple pie, will change your taste buds forever. It is like nothing on this earth will ever be the same again. 

Quince has alway been the pinnacle of the year for me although I have other fruit to pick and more than enough plums, pears, apples and hedgerow fruit to turn into jam, but I can hardly await the moment of the quince. He normally ripens at the end of an orchard year. He makes us wait until October and sometimes even November. A crowning glory of the orchard garden, if the seasons play by the books and the weather plays her part, he arrives like an ugly duckling awkward and very different! Growing in form, just like a misshapen pear, sometimes resembling that of a teardrop. He has pale yellow soft skin that covers an unusually hard fruit, but once you have managed to peel and chop into its flesh his beauty and scent will intoxicate you, but be warned once  you have cooked this remarkable, unique fruit and witness how it gives up its beauty and it shines and glows, you will be addictive, and forever under it’s spell. 

So as unsal I turn fruit into a jam and below I have shared my mum’s recipe with you.

For this recipe your need the usual equipment a large pan, wooden spoon, glass jars, lids, a jelly bag and stand. (if you don’t have a stand you can always tie it to an unturned stool, or chair.)

This recipe is similar to crab apple jelly, it the fact you just need to check your quinces for disease and bruises and add them to a pan and cover with enough water to boil them into a pulp.

I have given a weight but to be honest the weight of the fruit before cooking really is not important, so long as you have a fair amount of fruit to cover the bottom of your pan.

  • 1kg of quince chopped 9no need to peel or core) 
  • enough water to cover the quinces
  • sugar
  • Juice of a large lemon

 

  • Pop a small plate into the fridge to check for setting point. to sterilize the jars wash them  and place in an oven dish and turn your oven to 150C. Put your timer on for 12mins to remind you to turn off the oven.
  • brush off any dirt from the fruit and check for bruised or diseased, chop up the quinces (no need to peel or core) and place in pan with enough water to cover the fruit, cook on a low heat until the fruit has turned to mush this can take some time, especially if the fruit is very hard.
  • Once cooked place in a jelly bag and drip over night
  • Measure the juice and place in a jam pan (or heavy based pan) for each 570ml you will need add 454g of sugar.
  • Slowly dissolve the sugar and add the lemon juice.(you could add geranium leaves at this point)
  • Once the sugar is dissolved bring to the boil and check for setting point.( I have found that this sets very well and you need to have your jars ready to go)
  • Once the sugar has dissolved (about 5-8mins) bring the pan to a rolling boil
  • Remove from heat & check for setting point.
  • Carefully remove jars from oven.
  • Ladle jam into jars seal with clean lids
  • Label once cool.

If you have now fallen for the quince, and would like to try something a little more you could simply poach the fruit in a sugar syrup the same as you would do for a pear.
Peel the quinces and slice into 4 add these to a sugar syrup with a vanilla pod

  • 4 quinces peeled quartered and cored
  • 350g of sugar
  • 1 liter of water
  • 1 vanilla pod.
  • Heat the water, and vanilla sugar until it’s dissolved, add the peeled quinces and slowly bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer for about 45-60 mins. ( you could always bake them in the syrup in covered on a low heat for a few hours.)
  • Serve with clotted cream.

Red Moon & Jam

moon

 

A still moment in time that I hope to be able to visualise in my heart for ever, for a photograph can only ever hold an image. It may rekindle memories but it could ever convey the my magical moment of sitting outside with a blanket and a hot cup of tea and a very confused cat!

It’s 2.15 and I am watching the sun eclipse the moon on a clear night so bright I can read the stars like a recipe. For the first time ever I looked up and without a map I knew exactly what each star in this night sky is and I was so excited,  I could barely hold onto my voice and not shout out their names,  at last it’s sunk in!  So crystal clear and I can see everyone . I look back at the moon,and it has the appearance of someone draping a hearth rug over her while she sits by the fire, that gives her this earthly glow.  Not wanting to move a muscle as not to miss a second of such beauty I stare and breath in this extraordinary moment. I have to share this time, but who dare I ring at such a late hour? I conect with a few friends, just knowing that we are together looking, dreaming and experiencing the same sight fills my heart, wondering just how they feel.

Then it begins a heartbeat so loud almost deafening, I almost jump out of my seat looking around I steady my nervous its my heart its has started to race with the excitement of the event.  I breath in and smile all at the same time the air is motionless as it the world has stood still, and we watch her performance.  My thoughts begins to accelerate, are you meant to wish upon the moon or do I sing a song of love or do I ?? What might my mum have done? she would have chosen a wish, then wished to see her daughter and I too would have wished to see them both.

I pour another cup of tea from my flask wondering how mad I must look in an English garden with a blanket and flask of tea a stone’s throw from my kitchen.  Mrs moon how you make me laugh I look up at you above the cherry tree, where you have settled into your rug, and how very much you remind me a christmas bauble, and how surreal this all is, then without thinking my mind is in the vegetable plot! and without a moment to lose I jump up,  I grow biodynamically this is perfect for planting! I plant as many winter salad seeds I can see with the world’s smallest touch and red moon light. 

I laugh hoping not to wake the neighbors, they truly would then think that I was completely nuts! mmm then I start to think about Jam… wondering just how the fruit will set tomorrow, and although I have grown by biodynamic methods,  I have yet to note the setting points of jams by this method, so a project begins!

So this morning at first light I picked as many blackberries as my basket could carry and set off into the kitchen to cook the delights. After a few hours my basket was bare so I was off again, finding plenty more hedgerow bounty, each fruit seemed fuller and juicier than before. The I remembered the mushrooms I picked the day before, and off course I truffle hunt biodynamically!!! why O why had I not thought of it in all of my fruit foraging !! So without fail I produced a little chart to record the results. (I Love my reserch!) So if and when I get tangible results of biodynamic setting points in jam I shall let you know.  In the past I have recorded humidity measurements, it has and does affect, the jam setting point no matter the recipes.  In the meantime a little blackberry jam recipe.

 

  1. 2kg of blackberries
  2. 2 kgs of sugar 
  3. juice of one lemon

 

  • Wash and hull the blackberries
  • Sit the blackberrie in the sugar over night 
  • Pop a small plate into the fridge to check for setting point.Wash jars and place in an oven dish and turn your oven to 150C. Put your timer on for 12mins to remind you to turn off the oven.
  • Place the contents in a jam pan and cook on a low heat until all the sugar is dissolved 
  • Once the sugar has dissolved and the blackberries have started to cook (about 35mins) bring the pan to a rolling boil
  • Remove from heat & check for setting point.
  • Carefully remove jars from oven.
  • Ladle jam into jars seal with clean lids
  • Label once cool.

 

 

 

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Jennifer Williams

Chief Jam Maker

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