Whats your mums best dish?

My Beautiful Mum (aka Worlds Best cook )

Something is troubling me, for about a week or two, that set me on this path and I wanted to share it with you. My friend asked me what’s your favourite meal your mum cooked for you, that special dish if you could have it now what would it be?

An innocent question that stopped me in my tracks. My mind wonders and I am cross I can’t think.

I reconnect with the question for over two weeks, I can’t think,  I wonder through the memories of dinner parties, the chocolate eclairs at the winter wonderland party I ate so many I was sick. The apple pies with cinnamon pasty and slices of quince.

I am going mad,  I could cry as I don’t have a favourite, I see my friend’s smug face as she declares it’s my mums roast dinner, another announces it’s her mum’s pie and mash. But I have failed I can’t think of a single dish. I conclude that as her cooking was so legendary it must be that, that’s stopping me choose.

But no there must be that one?  like to love of your life!  when they enter the room you just know. But I don’t, and I feel I have failed my mum, by not having a favourite.  I’ve become obsessed with it, I wake up and wonder what it would be if I could sit down now and eat it.  I almost settle with the battered oysters, then the nettle soup, I finally finish on the treacle pudding, but NO there’s more!

Its only when I reach the quince tart that I stop dead in my tracks I travel through time and I’m in the kitchen, my mums smile fills the room my dad’s cheeky funny self is entertaining her, she slightly flushed from the warmth of the aga, and the air is filled with the smell of roasted pheasant, I can almost taste the potatoes as their slightly earthy aroma steams from the pan as they cook. A large green cabbage is on the side waiting to be chopped and added to the pan. The plates are added to the bottom oven and I catch the smell of a quince tart as the door closes.

The kitchen is starting to fill up with pans some on the heat some push aside I beg for nutmeg butter, to go with my cabbage and watch as she turns the squash in the roasting tray, as they jostle for space with the carrots. I feel the warmth of the room as it fills my soul with such joy. YES I’ve  remembered it’s! My Favourite dish, I want to go home, right now,  I want to go to Barland Cottage and lay the table, put out the serving dishes, stoke the fire and sit expecting while my mum brings the table to life. My dad makes a joke, and my mum’s laughter fills the air we giggle, after all, he’s funny. I can safely say I’ve remembered the dish its Roast Pheasant that’s my all-time favourite and something I’ve not been able to cook since my mum died. I miss my mums cooking, I miss roast pheasant. 

One day my Quince will Ripen!

 

Quince’s  have been grown for centuries, a fruit that is a quiet king of the orchard, a truly magnificent fruit. Here in England they are misunderstood, overlooked and underused, so get out and find your quince he may look like a frog but once you cook it it turns into a prince.  Something as simple as adding quince to an apple pie, will change your taste buds forever. It is like nothing on this earth will ever be the same again. 

Quince has always been the pinnacle of the year for me although I have other fruit to pick and more than enough plums, pears, apples and hedgerow fruit to turn into jam, but I can hardly await the moment of the quince. He normally ripens at the end of an orchard year. He makes us wait until October and sometimes even November. A crowning glory of the orchard garden, if the seasons play by the books and the weather plays her part, he arrives like an ugly duckling awkward and very different! Growing in form, just like a misshapen pear, sometimes resembling that of a teardrop. He has pale yellow soft skin that covers an unusually hard fruit, but once you have managed to peel and chop into its flesh his beauty and scent will intoxicate you, but be warned once  you have cooked this remarkable, unique fruit and witness how it gives up its beauty and it shines and glows, you will be addictive, and forever under it’s spell. 

So as  I turn fruit into a jam and below I have shared my mum’s recipe with you.

For this recipe your need the usual equipment a large pan, wooden spoon, glass jars, lids, a jelly bag and stand. (if you don’t have a stand you can always tie it to an upturned stool, or chair.)

This recipe is similar to crab apple jelly, it the fact you just need to check your quinces for disease and bruises and add them to a pan and cover with enough water to boil them into a pulp.

I have given a weight but to be honest the weight of the fruit before cooking really is not important, so long as you have a fair amount of fruit to cover the bottom of your pan.

  • 1kg of quince chopped (no need to peel or core) 
  • enough water to cover the quinces
  • sugar
  • Juice of a large lemon

 

  • Brush off any dirt from the fruit and check for bruised or diseased, chop up the quinces (no need to peel or core) and place in pan with enough water to cover the fruit, cook on a low heat until the fruit has turned to mush this can take some time, especially if the fruit is very hard.
  • Once cooked place in a jelly bag and drip over night
  • Measure the juice and place in a jam pan (or heavy based pan) for each 570ml you will need add 454g of sugar.
  • Slowly dissolve the sugar and add the lemon juice.(you could add geranium leaves at this point)
  • Once the sugar is dissolved bring to the boil and check for setting point.( I have found that this sets very well and you need to have your jars ready to go)
  • Once the sugar has dissolved (about 5-8mins) bring the pan to a rolling boil
  • Remove from heat & check for setting point.
  • Carefully remove jars from oven.
  • Ladle jam into jars seal with clean lids
  • Label once cool.

If you have now fallen for the quince, and would like to try something a little more you could simply poach the fruit in a sugar syrup the same as you would do for a pear.
Peel the quinces and slice into 4 add these to a sugar syrup with a vanilla pod

  • 4 quinces peeled quartered and cored
  • 350g of sugar
  • 1 liter of water
  • 1 vanilla pod.
  • Heat the water, and vanilla sugar until it’s dissolved, add the peeled quinces and slowly bring to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer for about 45-60 mins. ( you could always bake them in the syrup in covered on a low heat for a few hours.)
  • Serve with clotted cream.

I Love Elderberry Soup

 

The spring and summer cause great issues for foragers in the fact what do we pick first? There is so much ready all at once that it drives me mad, I work on average this time of year 18 hours, plus a day, the phone rings off the hook with many friends, family, and customers with news of a find, a new secret place to forage or they do indeed a glut of fruit that needs picking and of course (anyone who cooks will tell you this ) they all demand, new and interesting for recipes along with special tips and new ideas! I do my best and there’s the garden to tend too. Would I change it? No! Do I love it yes. 

However this year I am picking Rowan berries before elderberries that is a first for me. Elderberries need cooking before you eat them they can make you ill if uncooked.

The Leaves and stems mustn’t be used and these too can make you quite ill. So cook them first.  So yes you can make an amazing syrup, jam and jelly but here I like to tell you about a soup.

To get to the soup we first have to travel back in time to Barland Estate in Powys Wales and into Garden Cottage. In the garden the plums are ready to pick,  loganberries are ripping fast each day against the walled garden space dripping with flavour, the apples are promising a bumper crop and I am still picking raspberries, strawberries and of course, the currant cage is not giving in just yet. Our freezers are full and the larder is filling up. It’s early August and the kitchen hot from the Rayburn. A constant smell of cooking fruit fills our house.

A large bowl of water  with a small hint of wine, is on the heat, the air is filled with warm smells, first the fresh fruity aroma, then a whisper of cinnamon with undertones of  honey fill the air in between and remind me that the summer not going to last forever, my choice of school has been my undoing. I will at the end of this month get back on the bus and although my days will be busy, I not be with my mum & dad, my little brother and of  the mad dog “hop along Cassidy”  and I will miss them all so much along with the garden full of fruit and flowers, dinner will become just food.   I indeed missed them more than I ever told them. (Turn back the clock).

My mum’s storytelling was always fascinating and all the time she was passing on everything she learnt, she had a thirst for knowledge, and her desire to pass on everything she knows was so important. She was like a missionary spreading and sharing the word! Especially when she was in the kitchen, so as she cooked she told stories, and apart from cooking lessons we had, history lessons, art lessons and life lessons! Why, and how certain dishes came about why we forage and the importance of not forgetting what we once knew.

My mum was and is still my hero, she could cook anything and did indeed cook everything, and could make a meal from nothing. Her heart still beats in mine and although I miss her every single day I know she is with me every second. She made me who I am today, she taught me the love of life, passion and of course cooking.  She was outstanding at everything especially making soups, from all most anything from the garden. Even the hardened meat eater couldn’t resist her delicious green and bean soup. So as the seasons changed and slowly moved on so did the recipes and the soup. I not sure I could even to this day give you my favourite choice if I was to choose? Then I would choose them all a small tiny cup of each starting with the pea, then cold fennel, but always finishing with the Elderberry soup.

Elderberry Soup recipe 

 

1.5 litres of water

500g of Elderberries

2 tablespoons of Lemon Juice (one large lemon) 

100ml of white wine

1 stick of cinnamon

A little arrowroot to thicken or you can have this without if you would like a thin soup.

 

  1. Place on the heat water, wine, lemon juice and spice. 

Pick the elderberries off the stalks, discarding any leaves and stalks.

Add carefully to the warm water, bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and cook gently for 10-15 mins

The fruit will so mushy, Add a teaspoon of honey at this point.

  1. Strain the fruit and press out the juice. Then return the soup to the pan. (Discard the pulp)

If you would like a thicker soup, mix the arrow route with a drop of cold water and the rest of the lemon juice and pour into the soup and now season to your taste.

  1. Return to a soft heat and slowly bring to a light boil to cook the arrowroot and thicken the soup.

 

Serve with roasted ground cobnuts and sourdough bread croutons drizzled with honey.

Possible side effects (Autoimmune diseases” such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Elderberry might cause the immune system to become more active, and this could increase the symptoms of autoimmune diseases. If you have one of these conditions, it’s best to avoid using elderberry.)

Foraged & Grown

The first cut of walled garden flowers

Over the last 3 months I have undertook to restore a walled garden. A garden I found lost derelict and unloved, its a garden that Lewis Carol used in the Book Alice in Wonderland. The first book I read. Also not sure if I have told you but my mum was a brilliant chef and my dad a gardener. So this was a project calling out for me, so without a second thought I took on the challenge to restore and loving bring back this beauty. So I have drafted in the help of a few lovely friends and together our project will and has already, produced some home grown produce, organically and biodynamic for naked jam preserves, local hotels, discerning chefs, and other outlets such as Love to b who use all natural products in their wonderful skin care ranges.  The garden will also become a venue in its own right. Although a while off from being perfect, we have already booked a number of events.  Alongside the edible plants, we are growing cut flowers for wedding parties and empty vases!

One of the plans for the garden is to link it with a charity project “A cook in your Kitchen” which myself and a few friends set up last year. Brief details listed below.

To help people provide healthy home cooked meals for their families

To help people reduce their weekly food shopping bills

To help households reduce their household food waste.

The project will initially be run as a pilot and fully evaluated to test the viability of setting up a self- supporting social enterprise.To train a team of home cooks to go into customers homes and help families develop their cooking, budgeting and recycling skills .To record via a questionnaire survey the customers cooking , budgeting and recycling skills prior to the visit and after the home training session.

If you would like us to grow anything for you or your like to visit our walled garden please get in touch, I love to show you around and inspire you to grow too.  Or indeed help with our charity project please get in touch. Jen X 

Stop the morning and grab the toast!

Great Taste great jam !

Blackcurrant Extra Jam a winner , so is the Strawberry. So in 2013 I entered the great taste I won 2 * for my Lemon curd, 1* for my raspberry and in 2016 I entered again with strawberry syrup and yep it is a winner with 2 * so just when I thought I missed the enter deadline. I managed to squeeze in with 2 of my best selling products strawberry Jam and of course Blackcurrant, into 2017 awards. and……..this is what the judges said….

Strawberry jam achieved a star  the judges comments on this 
 
“Wonderful fresh summer strawberries on the nose, the set is perfect. The judges really liked the whole strawberries that still had a delightful texture and a lasting, fragrant strawberry flavour. Skillfully made”
 
and my Blackcurrant extra jam achieving 3 stars. I am feeling very proud of this achievement and I would like to thank you for the support, judges comments. 

“Beautiful deep blackcurrant flavours on the nose, a thick set, giving a deep, lasting flavour, not overly sweet, allowing the true fruit flavour to shine through. The judges loved the sheer intensity of fresh blackcurrant flavours, the quality of the fruit and gentle preservation.”

So if you fancy learning my secrets of great jam making come along to my cooking lessons at :

http://www.chewtonglen.com/the-kitchen/courses-pricing/exploring/spotted-potted-pickled/

Please get in touch

We'd love to hear from you

Jen

Jennifer Williams

Chief Jam Maker

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